Notice of Medicaid Ineligibility violates Due Process if it doesn’t specify the Reason

The Superior Court of Massachusetts recently addressed the question of whether a state Medicaid agency had given adequate notice to the Medicaid applicant of the reason for denial of eligibility. What’s useful for New Jersey purposes is the exended discussion of the federal regulations pertaining to Notices of denial, and the explanation given by the Court as to why the Notices in question were deficient.

The case concerned assets that were held in a Trust. An applicant cannot be eligible for Medicaid if his or her non-excluded “countable” resources exceed a certain limit. In this case, each Notice merely stated  that the applicant was ineligible due to having excess resources, but gave no explanation as to why the assets of the Trust were being counted as the applicant’s resources. The Court held that the Notice was deficient; stayed (enjoined) the denial of benefits pending the outcome of the lawsuit, and certified the case to move forward as a class action because the practice had adversely affected all the individuals in the lawsuit class in a similar manner.

Maas vs Sudders et al and Hirvi vs Sudders et al. (Mass Superior Court, 2018)

Federal regulations require that a Medicaid agency give explicit written notice of reasons for an adverse action and of the opportunities for appeal. The notice must be served on the affected individual. The law provides as follows:

§ 431.210 Content of notice.

A notice required under § 431.206 (c)(2), (c)(3), or (c)(4) of this subpart must contain –

(a) A statement of what action the agency, skilled nursing facility, or nursing facility intends to take and the effective date of such action;

(b) A clear statement of the specific reasons supporting the intended action;

(c) The specific regulations that support, or the change in Federal or State law that requires, the action;

(d) An explanation of –

(1) The individual‘s right to request a local evidentiary hearing if one is available, or a State agency hearing; or

(2) In cases of an action based on a change in law, the circumstances under which a hearing will be granted; and

(e) An explanation of the circumstances under which Medicaid is continued if a hearing is requested.”

We have seen situations over the years in which no reason was given for an adverse conclusion by the county Medicaid Agency. For example, the denial of benefits notice might just say “applicant has excess resources” without specifying which resources are allegedly in excess of the limits. There are times that there can be a bona fide legal and factual dispute over whether certain resources are countable or excludable. Or the denial notice might say that “there were transfers of assets in violation of N.J.A.C. 10:71-4.10″ without specifying what is being treated as a “transfer.” In some circumstances, a check that was payable to cash is treated as a gift to a third party (transfer of assets) for no reason other than it was a check payable to “cash.” An applicant needs to know just what the issue is, so that s/he can prepare for an appeal. This is a matter of Due Process, a principal established by the US Supreme Court in 1970 in the landmark case of Goldberg vs. Kelly.

Medicaid applications are a landmine of potential legal problems. Applicants can benefit by legal advice which protects their rights in this process.

For individual senior care advice on protecting your rights, interests and resources, call us at …. 732-382-6070