SS to allow predesignation of future Representative Payee

Congress has passed, and the President has signed,  the “Strengthening Protections for Social Security Beneficiaries Act of 2018”.  This statute makes changes to the Representative Payee system of the Social Security Act.

A Representative Payee is appointed by the Social Security Administration to handle the benefits of a person whom the SSA deems incapable of managing his or her own benefits. Examples are adults under guardianship, minors, and persons who suffer with severe cognitive or physical disabilities. A Representative Payee is like an informal Trustee — s/he is expected to keep the SSA income in a designated account [under the Social Security # of the incapable individual, of course] and spend it only on the SS recipient, unless there is a court order that allows other spending. The SSA sends out an annual report statement to the Representative Payees, who are expected to complete it, sign it under penalty of perjury, and return it to the SSA. Apparently there are insufficient resources to audit and monitor the millions of such reports that are filed each year, so there will be federal grants to state and local auditing entities..

Under Secn. 201,  Social Security or SSI recipients over age 18 can designate “at any time” a person — but not an organization — who they want as their Representative Payee should the SSA determine that such appointment is required. The Social Security Administration must select the designated individual as Rep. Payee with certain exceptions, most notably, if the person had been convicted of any of a wide range of crimes. Even that exclusion can be waived in certain cases involving a designated person who is in a close family relationship to the benefits recipient or in the “best interest” of the benefits recipient. Section 201 amends 42 USC sec. 405 (j)(i) by adding (C) (1) to the end of that subsection.

The Act doesn’t specify the form of document that the person needs to sign when making his or her own designation.  I think that it could be included as a paragraph in their Durable Power of Attorney. A State Guardianship Court could order that the Guardian have preference for appointment as a Representative Payee. Section 201 amends 42 USC sec. 405 (j)(i) by adding (C) (1) to the end of that subsection.

Within 18 months the SSA is required to issue regulations. Among other things, there must be forms provided, and the regulations must specify the information that beneficiaries must provide to SSA about the designated individuals. Also, the SSA will be required to notify beneficiaries who have designations annually with the names of the advance designees. The forms and instructions must be published by December 13, 2019.

Another useful amendment is found in Secn. 102. Under this amendment,  the Spouse or parent need not become Rep Payee for someone whose benefits they handle, if they live in the same household. This should make things more convenient for most cases. Of course, in a very bad situation, there could be a need for someone to intervene on behalf of the vulnerable adult in that household, but such an action can be initiated by any interested party if they become aware of the need for a protective arrangement.

Link to the statute permitting designation of a representative payee in advance is below:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4547/text

The law is effective two years after the date of signing, which will be April 13, 2020.

Pre-designation of a Representative Payee is just one component of a senior care and disability protection plan. Updated estate plan documents, powers of attorney, beneficiary adjustments, and other steps may be appropriate depending on the situation.  Each situation is unique and has its own special concerns.

For legal advice and assistance with elder care and disability planning, call us at ………. 732-382-6070

 

Trustee of Special Needs Trust must be cautious in making reimbursements

A person who is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) from the Social Security Administration must report changes in his income or resources (assets) to SSI, because this can affect his eligibility or the amount of benefits. If countable resources exceed $2,000 on the first of a month, eligibility can be lost. If the issue is detected after the fact, there can be a resulting overpayment than can take months to straighten out. If assets are placed into, or are being held in, a Trust, there might be an impact on eligibility depending on the terms of the Trust, how those assets are distributed by the Trustee, and how much control the SSI recipient has (if any) over the assets in the trust.

A Trust established with assets of the SSI recipient or applicant might be excluded from the $2,000 resource limit if it meets the many requirements  for a Special Needs Trust. Particular problems come up when somebody has been spending money on the beneficiary and needs to be reimbursed by the Trustee. The payments out of the Trust to that third party may be viewed by the Agency as improper disbursements that violate this “sole benefit” requirement if the trustee can’t produce satisfactory proof to justify the reimbursement. If the payments are made out of a first party trust, the entire corpus (principal; value) of the Trust may be treated as an available resource because the payments to the third party are “not for sole benefit” of the Trust beneficiary. If cash is just transferred out of the Trust to the third party’s account to use for the beneficiary, this can create problems as well.  The standards are explained by the Social Security Administration in this section 01120.201.2.b of of the procedure manual called the “POMS,”  where it says, ” …do not consider a trust that provides for the trust corpus or income to be paid to or for a beneficiary other than the SSI applicant/recipient to be established for the sole benefit of the individual.” The POMS continues:

. ” Exceptions to the sole benefit rule for third party payments

“Consider the following disbursements or distributions to be for the sole benefit of the trust beneficiary:

  • Payments to a third party that result in the receipt of goods or services by the trust beneficiary;
  • Payment of third party travel expenses which are necessary in order for the trust beneficiary to obtain medical treatment; and
  • Payment of third party travel expenses to visit a trust beneficiary who resides in an institution, nursing home, or other long-term care facility (e.g., group homes and assisted living facilities) or other supported living arrangement in which a non-family member or entity is being paid to provide or oversee the individual’s living arrangement. The travel must be for the purpose of ensuring the safety and/or medical well-being of the individual.”

These are limited exceptions. If the Trustee is issuing payments to individuals under the guise that it is a reimbursement for expenditures that aren’t within these narrow categories, there will be a presumption that the trust is giving out money to third parties unless the Trustee can prove otherwise. The Trustee of any Trust for benefit of a person on SSI needs to assume that s/he will have to provide accountings and receipts in exquisite detail for scrutiny by the Social Security Administration. Great care should be exercised once a trustee takes on this major responsibility.

For advice on establishing and administering Special Needs Trusts, call ….. 732-382-6070